Additional Resources for Module 2 Reading 3

Module Number: 
2
Parent Reading: 
Module 2 Reading 3
Part Number: 
4
Microbe Table Type: 
Student Specific Text: 

This engaging docudrama shows how John Snow, a London physician, traced a major outbreak of cholera in the 1850s to its source. Using logic, statistics, and mapping, Snow determined that contaminated water was responsible for spreading the disease among the local population. Snow’s techniques and approaches became the foundation of modern epidemiology—the science of public health that is built on probability, statistics, and sound research methods.

The site Cholera and Thames provides additional information about the outbreaks of cholera in London in the 1800s in downloadable set of teacher notes, which provides primary source material related to the outbreaks and John Snow’s investigations. This site also provides an interactive game in which students can take on the role of John Snow as he collects data to track down the source of the disease.

Teacher Specific Text: 

This engaging docudrama shows how John Snow, a London physician, traced a major outbreak of cholera in the 1850s to its source. Using logic, statistics, and mapping, Snow determined that contaminated water was responsible for spreading the disease among the local population. Snow’s techniques and approaches became the foundation of modern epidemiology—the science of public health that is built on probability, statistics, and sound research methods.

The site Cholera and Thames provides additional information about the outbreaks of cholera in London in the 1800s in downloadable set of teacher notes, which provides primary source material related to the outbreaks and John Snow’s investigations. This site also provides an interactive game in which students can take on the role of John Snow as he collects data to track down the source of the disease.

Students can work with John Snow’s data to determine for themselves the source of the cholera outbreak in London in 1854. Students develop a working hypothesis about the source of the disease and then use data as evidence to prove or disprove their hypothesis. This activity can be found in Insights in Biology: A Journey of Discovery Kendall/Hunt publisher 2007 pp. 305 - 317